11/28/2010

Wine Geek Speak: Reserve

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Hello Friends,

Have you ever been in a wine shop or tasting room and seen the word “Reserve” on a wine label? Without even a swirl, sniff and sip, you are likely to assume that this is a wine of high quality. Especially since a “Reserve” wine is usually more expensive than a non-Reserve wine and you know the saying – “you get what you pay for.” But wait a minute! Even though you’ll find this term on U.S. wine labels under naming conventions like Estate Reserve, Private Reserve, Vintners’ Reserve, etc. or just Reserve, there is no legal definition in the U.S. to ensure the wine contained in the bottle meets any quality standard(s). Some consider the addition of “Reserve” on a wine label to be a marketing stratagem and, whether the wine in the bottle merits the distinction or not, in a way it is. In wine producing regions Italy, Portugal, and Spain, the term does have a defined meaning, but this has more to do with the time a wine must spend in barrel and bottle as well as alcohol requirements.

What makes a wine a "Reserve" ?


For a taste test, I purchased two U.S. Pinot Noir wines from a producer who makes a “Reserve” label and a non-Reserve label. In tasting these two wines [blind] with a group, the “Reserve” wine, which cost $6 more, had clearly seen more time in slightly used and / or new oak barrels. All of the tasters overwhelmingly preferred the non-Reserve wine, as it offered bright red fruit, perfume, spice, and a pleasing palate. The other, while a Reserve, was overpowered and outdone by the oak. For a consumer seeking some sign of fruit in their wine, this woodsy selection would prove less than desirable. The next time you find yourself in a wine shop or tasting room and are considering purchasing a “Reserve” wine, ask why it's a "Reserve" wine. Typically, you want to hear that this bottling is the producer's best fruit, best barrels, and was handled with the utmost care and attention to detail. When a producer opts to use “Reserve” on his/her wine label, the wine inside should be the best representation of what the winery has produced for a particular vintage. Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned friends ...More to come!

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11/22/2010

Thanksgiving Wine Find with Blue Ridge Wine Excursions


Hello Friends,

This past Friday I took in the last of the gorgeous fall colors and toured the Monticello wine trail with Blue Ridge Wine Excursions. The touring service recently partnered with local wine expert, Richard Leahy, to provide enjoyable and informative guided wine tours for those who not only desire to sip, but to learn more about the wineries, the area, the producers, and of course – the wine.

Blenheim Vineyard (Tasting Room)


Our media tour’s theme was “Virginia Wine for Thanksgiving.” We paid visits to three Monticello AVA producers with the goal of finding wines that would best suit the traditional Thanksgiving dinner. Virginia wines are versatile and a great match for a wide variety of foods, so finding the right Virginia wine is not an arduous task. While you will experience some vintage variation from one growing season to the next, Virginia wine, both red and white, is generally harmonious and supple with good food-friendly acidity.

Tasting with winemaker Kirsty Harmon


Thanksgiving dinner lends itself to a wide variety of flavors, textures and aromas. The key is to find a wine that will complement your meal and not overwhelm it. For this reason, Pinot Noir and Riesling are popular picks. The overall hot and humid climate here in Virginia doesn’t quite roll out the red carpet for cool climate varieties like Pinot Noir and Riesling, but there are some nice alternatives like Viognier, Petit Manseng, Cabernet Franc, Chambourcin, Petit Verdot, Norton, classic style Chardonnay and Merlot – all of which do well here in Virginia.

Beautiful Vineyard View at Montdomaine


Virginia also produces some nice sparkling wines, and bubbles are a good way to kick off Thanksgiving Day festivities. Don’t forget about the summer Rosé wines you may still have in the refrigerator. These wines are best enjoyed young and are good opening acts for any dinner party; including Thanksgiving.

Enjoying Montdomaine's 2008 Merlot


During our wine tour, I found several Virginia wines that could be at the center of your Thanksgiving Day dinner. Our first stop was to Blenheim Vineyards, a beautiful winery and tasting room owned by rock-star Dave Matthews and family. Dave has a rock-star wine-maker in Kirsty Harmon, who is producing some very nice, well-balanced, easy drinking wines. Blenheim Vineyard’s well-made 2009 Viognier was one of my top picks for Thanksgiving. It’s dry and fresh with good acidity, a kiss of toast, and could be enjoyed with anything from appetizers to the main dish.

Richard Leahy and Michael Bowles


Our next visit was with Michael Bowles, founder and owner of the pioneering Virginia winery, Montdomaine. Montdomaine recently resurfaced as a label after more than a fifteen year absence and boasts some of the oldest vinifera vines in the state. Being a fan of Virginia wine history, visiting with Michael was a treat. Montdomaine planted their vineyard in 1977, one year after Barboursville planted theirs.  Montdomaine’s wines garnered numerous awards, including the esteemed Governor's Cup, for their 1990 Cabernet Sauvignon. Proof that [some] Virginia wines can get better with age, Michael uncorked a Montdomaine 1987 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon that still had a lot of life, wonderful fruit complexity, good structure, and other pleasing charms that only come from patience and proper cellaring.

Well Hung Vineyard label


Michael’s wife, Loree, was kind enough to prepare delicious appetizers for us that paired perfectly with Montdomaine’s Chardonnay, Viognier, Merlot, and Cabernet Sauvignon – all of which were very nice wines. The 2008 Merlot, produced from some of the oldest Merlot vines in the state, is my Thanksgiving Day pick. The 2008 Merlot is smooth, with a soft texture and offers cherry and plum aromas with hints of spice. Its easy going and unpretentious character complements Thanksgiving fare and should be in your glass when the turkey is being carved and served.

Well Hung Vineyard Manager - Amy Steers


Our last stop of the day was to Well Hung Vineyard. We had the pleasure of meeting with vineyard manager Amy Steers, her husband Bill, and their son Colin, who does a very good job running the label's social media accounts. Well Hung’s name and logo is marketing genius. I have seen their name and logo repeatedly in social media circles but hadn’t tasted their wines. Clearly, the catchy name attracts you, but it’s the wine in the bottle that hooks you. Michael Shaps, a well-known Virginia winemaker and part owner of custom-crush facility Virginia Wine Works, makes wine for Montdomaine as well as Well Hung Vineyard. That said, each producer has a unique style, uses different fruit, but both are equally as good.

In the vineyard with Amy Steers


Amy spends much of her time in the vineyard and the family is very passionate about growing high-quality wine grapes to produce good quality Virginia wines. Their vineyard was established in 2000 and they sold their fruit to nearby wineries. In 2009, Well Hung produced their first vintage under their unforgettable label. For your dinner guests seeking a Virginia wine with a little more heft, I selected the Well Hung 2008 Private Select. The Private Select is a 50/50 blend of Cabernet Sauvignon and Petit Verdot and offers brambly dark fruit, earthy qualities, baking spice, and has a solid structure with a long lingering finish. This wine presents an opportunity to show off your beautiful decanter to dinner guests. I would suggest decanting this selection for at least three hours prior to dinner.

Beautiful Sunset at Well Hung Vineyard


For the sweet ending, Virginia produces a number of Late Harvest dessert wines and several off-dry Port-style wines to complement popular Thanksgiving Day favorites: pumpkin and pecan pie [yum]. In the end, there are no hard rules for what you should or should not have on your table. The food and wine should complement one another and not overwhelm or overpower. The right pairing will bring out nuances and enhance the flavors and characters of both the food and the wine. Enjoy the food and wine pairings, family and friends, and have a Happy Thanksgiving Day.    

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned friends ...More to come!

INFO: CLICK HERE to follow Blenheim Vineyard on Twitter.

INFO: CLICK HERE to follow Montdomaine on Twitter. (NOTE: Open by appointment only)

INFO: CLICK HERE to follow Well Hung Vineyard on Twitter. (NOTE: Open by appointment only)

Tour Service Info: Blue Ridge Wine Excursions, E-Mail: andrea@albemarlevintagelimousine.com or call 434 531-5802.

CLICK HERE to visit Richard Leahy's wine website.

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11/18/2010

Winner-Winner, 8 Chains North Wine Dinner!

Hello Friends,

This past Friday, I had the pleasure of attending the 8 Chains North post-harvest wine dinner. 8 Chains North is a small, family-owned winery located in Waterford, Virginia that’s a newcomer to the Loudoun County wine trail. 8 Chains North is operated by Ben Renshaw, who serves as grape-grower, winemaker, and owner, and is one of the nicest guys you'll ever meet in the Loudoun County wine industry.
8 Chains North


Ben’s an advocate of the local food and wine movement and this was reflected in the evening’s dinner menu. The menu highlighted seasonal, locally grown and raised foods paired with locally grown wines. One thing of note that I personally found considerate and kind, was that Ben featured several wines that were from his Loudoun friends and colleagues alongside his very own. This is called supporting your local [wine] neighbors, friends.

Enjoying LoCo Vino  w/ baked oysters before the dinner event


The five-course meal kicked-off with tasty Virginia baked oysters with fennel and jack cheese jalapeno crab dip hors’dourves paired with the 8 Chains North LoCo Vino (50/50 Traminette and Vidal Blanc) blend and Hiddencrofts’s 2007 Chambourcin. Next up, and a pairing that hit the spot considering the cool and crisp fall evening, was the local Lost Corner Farm roasted winter squash soup. This winter warming dish paired nicely with the refreshing and well-balanced Tarara Winery 2009 Nevaeh White (Viognier and Chardonnay) blend. We were told whilst enjoying this delightful course that the squash and the grapes used in making the blend were grown less than a mile apart. How cool is that! Another enticing course – and we’re just on the appetizer – was the Virginia stuffed (spinach, goat cheese, sage pesto butter) trout paired with the 8 Chains North Sauvignon Blanc. The Sauvignon Blanc is done in a Fume Blanc style, but not as assertive as west coast examples, yet refreshing and round, making it an ideal match for the fish. The main course, a delectable Loudoun raised country lamb dish, was paired with the 8 Chains North 2008 Furnace Mountain Red (Bordeaux-style) blend. The Furnace Mountain Red, a supple and harmonious blend, showcasing all five Bordeaux varieties, offers layers of complex, yet restrained fruit, with hints of spice,  vanilla bean, and a touch of mocha. The wine complimented the earthiness and richness of the lamb dish perfectly and based on conversations heard – dinner guests loved it! For the sweet ending, we enjoyed a caramel crème brulée made with local Moutoux Orchard caramelized apples. This tasty sweet treat was paired with the North Gate Vineyard Apple wine. The wine’s refreshing and off-dry character had just the right amount of crispness and sweetness to round out the dessert dish and ready your palate for another bite.

Simply Beautiful Decor ~ My camera does it no justice.


The talented individual behind the glorious meal was Chef Steve Ryder, who was voted 2009 Chef of the Year by the Nation’s Capital Chef’s Association. The Chef’s well-prepared and scrumptious menu items and tasty Virginia wine selections made for an enjoyable evening of great food and wine pairings. This was 8 Chains North first in a series of local food and wine inspired dinners that will feature seasonal foods paired with Virginia wines. In closing, be sure to check 8 Chains North website for future dinner events. Their first was quite a treat and ran so smoothly you would have sworn they were doing this for the hundredth time. I extend a grateful tip of the hat to Ben, the Chef, and all those who made the evening memorable.

Having a Sip with Jordan (Tarara) and Ben


Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned friends ...More to come!

INFO: CLICK HERE to join 8 Chains North Facebook group.
INFO: CLICK HERE to follow 8 Chains North on Twitter.

Winery Info: 8 Chains North,38593 Daymont Ln, Waterford, VA 20132

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11/15/2010

Quick Sip: 2008 Flat Creek Estate Super Texan

Hello Friends,

Last month, while Virginia wine lovers were celebrating Virginia wine month, our friends down south were celebrating Texas wine month. Having lived in Texas for over a decade during my collegiate years and thereafter, I didn’t have a clue wine was grown and produced in Texas. However, in my defense, I wasn’t a wine drinker back then either. I know, shame on me, right? I first learned about Texas wine the same way many people learn about Virginia wine - through wine blogs. Vintage Tweets and Vinotology were two wine blogs that introduced me to what was going on in Texas wine country. My punk rock pal Ben Simmons of Vinotology has since moved out west and is doing a great job covering the wines of Washington State. Before Ben left Texas, he sent a nice Texas gem my way. I waited a while to open it up, but you know the saying, “Good things come to those who wait.” And it did!

2008 Flat Creek Estate Super Texan


It doesn’t surprise me that the Texans would produce a wine that pairs well with BBQ. The wine I uncorked to celebrate Texas wine month was a 2008 Flat Creek Estate Super Texan. A name play on the Italian Super Tuscan, the Super Texan is a Texas grown Sangiovese based blend. The wine displays a youthful ruby color with raspberry, dried cranberry, and spice aromas dotted with hints of toast and smoke. On the palate, the wine is medium bodied and easy drinking with good acidity, bright red fruit flavors, and a nice medium length refreshing finish. The acidity and suppleness makes this wine perfect for food pairing. Like any good Texan would do, I paired this wine with a brisket dinner and the match was very enjoyable. The Flat Creek Estate Super Texan retails for $19.95, clocks in at 13.9% ABV, and has a real cork enclosure. Texas is an up-and-coming wine industry, boasting eight AVA’s and over 160 wineries. As a former Texan, I’m glad to see the state I once called home making a name for itself in the world of wine. Go Texas!

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned friends ...More to come!

INFO: CLICK HERE to follow Flat Creek Estate on Twitter.


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11/08/2010

Screw Tops: Friend or Enemy of Wine?

Hello Friends,

For centuries, cork has long been considered the premier stopper of wine. The issue of cork taint stirred up the enclosure market and spurred many wine producers to find alternative solutions. One alternative, the screw top, which had previously been used for inexpensive and ordinary wines, found favor among a few New World wine regions. Nowadays, quality wines from the United States, New Zealand, Australia, etc., are using screw tops for their everyday and fine wines. Here in Virginia, Tarara Winery and Blenheim Vineyards are the first wine producers to move their entire wine portfolio to a screw top enclosure system. While the cork industry has identified the cause of cork taint and advanced its manufacturing process, screw tops are here to stay. That said, some wine consumers are still uncertain about wines with a screw top enclosure. For that reason, I have asked Jordan Harris, General Manager and winegrower at Tarara Winery, to demystify screw tops for us.

Jordan Harris of Tarara Winery


Guest Post:

Screw Tops: Friend or Enemy of Wine?

I find great advantages in being a professional in an industry that honors hard-working traditions while being of a younger generation with the potential to offer fresh perspective. Speculation concerning alternative enclosures is one of the most talked about issues facing the industry today, and the decisions being made are pivotal to the quality and innovation within our region. In response to increased proclivity to seal bottles with screw tops, winemakers often receive the same five dissenting arguments:
  1.  Corks have been a tradition for hundreds of years.
  2.  Corks and opening the wine are the most romantic parts of the experience.
  3.  Consumers are not willing to pay for wines in screw tops.
  4.  Wines closed with screw tops do not age as well.
  5.  Wines closed with screw tops have “reductive” issues.
The foundation of tradition as an argument is plausible in as much as one should understand history in order to better the practices of today.  Understanding corks and their positive attributes is essential in understanding how to make wine in alternative closures.  Still, the fact is that the “traditional” closure causes between 5-7% of wine (equivalent to about 1 bottle per case) to be noticeably ‘off,’ wreaking of moldy newspaper or a musty old basement.

Cork or Cap?


This odorous flaw in the wine is created by a chemical called TCA (2-4-6 Trichloroanisole) which can be found technically on anything that contains phenols (i.e., woods, plastics, grape skins and, thus, wine) when it comes in contact with certain sterilizing agents and mold. Tricholoanisole is incredibly potent. Studies show that the average person can detect TCA at a level of 4 parts per trillion in wines. Some critics have proven able to sense TCA at levels hovering around 1 ppt; this trace amount is the equivalent to approximately one sugar cube in 100 Olympic size swimming pools! While TCA is completely harmless to human beings, it has detrimental effect to the aroma and flavor of the wine; in many instances it has ruined entire vintages of a wine. The problem corks lend to this issue is that they create an inconsistency, an unknown variable once the wine is bottled. Imagine how different the world would be today if accepting a 5-7% failure rate were the norm.

The romantic rush of uncorking a bottle is hardly an argument for sacrificing the integrity of what rests inside; most of the time this process works out to be quite the opposite. How many times have we set to open a bottle of wine just to have the cork snap in half? We blush because this ‘never’ happens to anyone in the industry and look silly as we relentlessly attempt to dig that last 1/8 of an inch of cork. Finally, we end up pushing it into the bottle and surrendering ourselves to a glass riddled with spongy floaters. Then there is the instance of strong-arming the cork out of the bottle, pulling so hard a splash of your favorite Syrah tie dyes your date’s new white shirt. It could happen to any of…and probably has. This could be avoided by using one of these new space-age corkscrews with more arms and gears than there are grape varietals, but your date is gone before you figure out the mechanics. Now it is your 25th Anniversary, and you have chosen the last bottle of a special vintage from your cellar. Assuming you get so far as to pour the nectar unscathed, your toast is burned by the realization that your celebration smells like moldy newspaper! The sad state of affairs in which you could find yourself is hardly traditional or romantic.

Tarara's Beautiful Shadow Lake


A consumer’s unwillingness to pay for wines under screw top, particularly for ultra premium wines has never been substantiated. Many people in the wine industry have under-estimated our wine buying public. Currently, our best-selling wine is also the first screw top to be released. It is a red blend (the current vintage is Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Merlot) that retails for $25 per bottle. This is only the first of the Tarara lineup to be closed with screw tops; we will be 100% screw top within a year as the 2007 reds and 2008 whites are released. In many areas of the world screw tops are now considered the norm. Australia and New Zealand close 85% of their wines with screw tops, including high-end reds and whites exceeding $100 per bottle. There are now Grand Cru Burgundies, top Loire Valley and producers in northeast Italy (Veneto) using screw tops. These and other wineries realize that the consumer wants a great bottle of wine, and if the odds are better using a screw top, then the practice is worthwhile for most. One may argue if the best part of a bottle of wine is opening it, then it is a bad bottle of wine.

Many industry professionals insist that wines do not age well in screw tops, and that they have not been tested to have shown being successful aging. These closures are no longer new, and there are many examples of wines from the United States, Australia and New Zealand that have been aging gracefully under these screw tops for well over 15 years. To some, these wines are better developed than their cork-stopped counterparts. They gain lovely tertiary characters that are normal during the aging process while retaining their freshness and lively fruit characteristics creating a wine of better complexity and balance. Are they identical to wine with a cork? No, but after 10-15 years no two wines with corks are going to be identical either. Each bottle will age slightly differently under a cork; there is very little consistency. Screw tops result in more consistency bottle to bottle, even after extended aging. At Tarara Winery, we craft wines that we believe will age gracefully for well over a decade. Some bottles from our first vintage in 1989 are drinking beautifully today. We think that using screw tops is just one more step to ensuring that our wines will be fantastic upon release and after aging for years.

Screw Tops: Friend or Enemy of Wine?


The final argument concerning reduction generally comes from people within the wine trade, and cork producers. There are many believers within the industry that wines closed under screw tops suffer from Reductive qualities. Sulfides, naturally occurring compounds in wine, are often added to protect against unwanted yeasts and microbes as well as oxidation. These compounds have the capacity to reduce and create ‘off’ flavors similar to rotten eggs or at the lower spectrum almost of a fresh un-used garbage bag. This reaction happened frequently before winemakers became more knowledgeable about newer technologies. Today, winemakers can be far more diligent in their oxygen management and sulfide addition techniques to be certain that there are no reducible sulfides in the wine before bottling. When employing screw tops, winemakers may craft a wine using less sulfides since this enclosure creates a more consistently anaerobic environment.

Screw tops are one of many recent developments in the form of wine closures. These innovative enclosures are not symbols of a fading tradition, a fizzling romance or a cheap date for entry level wines. Screw tops are a modern, innovative way to be certain that the wine ends up on the dinner table exactly as the winemaker intended it to taste. It is about insuring the quality of our time-honored tradition- taking an age old libation that brings so many of us happiness and twisting modern technology on tight to make certain the consumer has the opportunity to taste the fruit in its finest form from vine to bottle to glass.

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned friends ...More to come!

INFO: CLICK HERE to join Tarara Winery's Facebook group.
INFO: CLICK HERE to follow Tarara Winery on Twitter.

Winery Info: Tarara Winery,13648 Tarara Lane, Leesburg, VA 20176-5236, (703) 771-7100

Wine gift baskets and fine wine: Get 50% off shipping when you purchase 6 or more bottles with code "vine14"


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11/05/2010

Fall Splendor at Bluemont Vineyard

Hello Friends,

I recently paid a visit to Bluemont Vineyard, located in Bluemont, VA, to enjoy a glass of Virginia wine and get an eye-full of Mother Nature’s fall colorations. Bluemont's attractive tasting room is nestled on the eastern slope of the Blue Ridge Mountains (951 feet above sea level) and on a clear day you can see the top of the Washington Monument. Bluemont Vineyard is a small, low production farm winery that produces a wide variety of accessible wines - ranging from Viognier, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc, etc., to several fruit wines made from locally grown fruit sourced from neighboring Great Country Farms. The tasting fee is $5 and wine can be purchased by bottle and glass. Bottle prices range from $17 to $22 and glass prices range from $7 to $8.

View from the deck of Bluemont Vineyard


The tasting room offers light to medium fare and also boasts a home décor and gift shop. During my visit, I took in the spectacular views from the expansive wrap-around deck and enjoyed a fuller bodied Cabernet Sauvignon that paired nicely with the cool and crisp fall day. The staff is friendly and knowledgeable and the atmosphere relaxed and welcoming. Are you looking to get away from the hustle and bustle of the city? Take a respite to Bluemont Vineyard and spend the day enjoying Virginia wine and the beautiful countryside. Please click on the video clip below; these are some of the sights I enjoyed during my visit. (NOTE: If you have trouble viewing the video, please click on the following link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppjX0fQGUfA )

Click on video below:



Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned friends ...More to come!

INFO: CLICK HERE to join Bluemont's Facebook group.

Winery Info: Bluemont Vineyard, 18755 Foggy Bottom Road, Bluemont, VA 20135

Wine gift baskets and fine wine: Get 50% off shipping when you purchase 6 or more bottles with code "vine14"


My Vine Spot

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Happy Sipping Friends - Tell your friends about the blog and thanks for your support and kind emails !

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11/02/2010

Good Wine, Great View, but how about Customer Service?

Hello Friends,

Customer service is vital to the success of any business. Despite how good your product or service is, customer service can make you or it can break you. In the wine industry good customer service is vital. The attention to detail a winery invests in their wine production and tasting room should also be poured into their customer service – no pun intended. I recently took a customer service poll over a three week period on Twitter and the general consensus among Virginia wine lovers was that if customer service is not good at a winery, they are not likely to be repeat customers - even if the wine and ambience are above average. Word of mouth is a two way street, and while some people will sing praises about your business if they have an overall nice experience, many more will spread their displeasure about your business via review sites such as Yelp, via social media outlets, and person to person. For example, a couple recently tweeted from the tasting bar of a Virginia winery that their ‘pourer’ left them for an extended period of time and they were not having a pleasant tasting experience and would never return. Interestingly enough, during my polling, many people stated that if the wine and ambience are just okay, and the customer service is good, they are likely to return and tell a friend. I hear and receive a lot of comments, both good and bad, via my wine blog about many of our 160+ producers. One Loudoun County producer I often hear positive things about is Corcoran Vineyards. For that reason, I’ve asked owner and winemaker Lori Corcoran to tell us some of her keys to good customer service in the tasting room.

Lori Corcoran of Corcoran Vineyards


Guest Post:

Good Wine, Great View, but how about Customer

I would love to say that it’s the wine that keeps the customers coming back or the beautiful pond to sit by, but the reality is we are in the hospitality business. Our goal here at Corcoran is to let our guests escape the everyday stresses and worries and come out to the tasting room to just relax.

It's not the beautiful pond, it's "Customer Service"....

The first step to successful customer service is hiring the right staff. This is the most difficult aspect of the business. We have interviewed numerous people to try and find the person who exhibits a friendly smile with the ability to listen to our customers. It is a bonus if they have wine knowledge - we can train and enhance that aspect, but a must is to have the passion of a fun and friendly wine environment.

Corky sure knows how to liven up a tasting room!


Once we find the right folks to work in the tasting room, we have them work side-by-side with either Jim or I so they can better understand our wine speak, the history of Corcoran, as well as the wines they will be pouring. Our focus here at Corcoran is to make sure that our staff is friendly and that means customer friendly. They have to be enthusiastic individuals!

Info: Corcoran Vineyards • 14635 Corkys Farm Lane • Waterford, Virginia 20197 • 540-882-9073

CLICK HERE to follow Corcoran on Twitter.
CLICK HERE to friend Corcoran on Facebook.

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned friends ...More to come!

Wine gift baskets and fine wine: Get 50% off shipping when you purchase 6 or more bottles with code "vine14"


My Vine Spot

  • Please Click Here to vote Dezel's My Vine Spot as your favorite wine blog - You can vote 1x per day!
  • Friend me up on Face-Book here.

Happy Sipping Friends - Tell your friends about the blog and thanks for your support and kind emails !

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