2/23/2011

Quick Sip: Domaine Carneros 2008 Pinot Noir

Purchase a half-case or more of our fine wine and get 50% off shipping with code "vine23"



Hello Friends,

Today’s ‘Quick Sip’ is the Domaine Carneros 2008 Estate Pinot Noir. Domine Carneros is located in the heart of Carneros, a cool-climate wine region in California that spans across both (south) Napa and Sonoma counties. The cool climate of the Carneros AVA (American Viticulture Area) makes it ripe for growing classic varieties like Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. Domaine Carneros was established in 1987 by Taittinger, a French wine family famous for Champagne. Their original focus was to produce world-class sparkling wine out of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. After selling their Pinot Noir fruit to some of the area’s top producers, the winery decided to bottle their own Pinot Noir wines in 1992. Today, Domaine Carneros is an organic producer specializing in sparkling wine and Pinot Noir produced from almost 100% estate grown (Carneros Appellation) fruit. Let’s uncork this Pinot and give it a swirl, sniff, and sip!

Domaine Carneros 2008 Estate Pinot Noir


In the glass, the Domaine Carneros 2008 Estate Pinot Noir is a beautiful deep ruby color. The swirl and sniff reveals a pretty, nicely scented wine that boasts inviting aromas of raspberry, black cherry, sweet-plum, and a kiss of toast with soft herbal and baking spice notes. On the sip, this medium-bodied wine is smooth and supple with pleasant fruit, moderate acidity, a nice silky texture, and a long lasting finish. The Domaine Carneros 2008 Estate Pinot Noir retails for $35.00, has a real cork enclosure, and clocks in at 14.2% ABV. This Pinot sips well on its own and is versatile enough to marry with a wide variety of foods. A friend who tasted this wine with me and enjoyed it, has already made calls and found it at local Wegmans and Total Wine stores where it retails for $25 to $28. The next time you see a Domaine Carneros sparkling wine or Pinot Noir in your local wine shop, I suggest giving this producer a try. Cheers!

** Local Twist **  I have found based on what I taste, that some of the best regions for Pinot Noir are cooler climate wine regions such as Burgundy (FR), Central Otago (NZ), Willamette Valley (OR), Carneros (CA), Russian River Valley (CA), etc. Virginia is not a cool climate wine region; therefore, in my humble opinion, the small amount of Pinot Noir planted here is best suited for sparkling wine. That said, the late Juanita Swedenburg, co-founder of Swedenburg Vineyards in Middleburg, Virginia, planted, crafted, and made popular, a Virginia Pinot Noir wine that quickly sells out in their tasting room. I recommend giving it a try if you want to see what Virginia can do with the finicky Pinot Noir variety. Disclosure: A sample was provided to www.myvinespot.com for review. Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned friends ...More to come!

CLICK HERE to friend-up Domaine Carneros on Face-book.

CLICK HERE to visit the Domaine Carneros website.

Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!

My Vine Spot

  • Please Click Here to vote Dezel's My Vine Spot as your favorite wine blog - You can vote 1x per day!
  • Friend me up on Face-Book here.

Happy Sipping Friends - Tell your friends about the blog and thanks for your support and kind emails !

Dezel's My Vine Spot © 2006-2011. All rights reserved.

2/16/2011

Wine Blogging Wednesday #70: Spain!

Hello Friends,

Wine Blogging Wednesday, the blogosphere’s monthly virtual wine tasting event, created by Lenn Thompson of the New York Cork Report, makes its return from a brief hiatus with WBW70. Our host this month is Ryan and Gabriella Opaz of Catavino. The blogging duo selected Spain as the theme and asked us to choose a Spanish wine and blog about it. But not just any Spanish wine -- they asked that we select something creative, something unique, and something that we don’t swirl, sniff, and sip on a regular basis. I drink my fair share of Spanish vino. I find Spain to be a region where good quality, value-priced wines can easily be found. One type of Spanish wine that I don’t drink enough of is Sherry. Think about it, when is the last time you had a splash of Sherry? I know it has been a few months for me. Sherry is made in the Jerez-Xérès-Sherry y Manzanilla de Sanlúcar de Barrameda DO in southern Spain and is one of the worlds three great fortified wines along with Port and Madeira. There are two basic types of Sherry, Fino and Oloroso, but styles range from light and dry to rich and very sweet. I went with the latter, so if you enjoy a sinfully sweet dessert wine, you’ll love this selection, friends.

Osborne Sherry Pedro Ximinez 1827 NV


The wine I selected for WBW #70 is the Osborne Sherry Pedro Ximinez 1827 (NV). Named after the white-wine grape variety [Pedro Ximinez] grown in southern Spain, the Osborne Pedro Ximinez displays a wonderful deep amber color. The swirl and sniff boasts sweet raisin-like aromas with notes of brown sugar, fig, cocoa, molasses, and a light almond component. On the sip, the wine is full-bodied and rich, offering sinfully sweet raisin, prune, and caramel flavors that coat the mouth with a lip-smacking, long lingering candied finish. Osborne Sherry Pedro Ximinez 1827 (NV) retails for $24, has a rotating enclosure, and clocks in at 17% ABV. Wine Enthusiast thought quite highly of this sweet and sticky treat, rating it 94 points. Serve this wine at room temperature or a little cooler and pair it with your favorite dessert, or better yet, enjoy it as the dessert. This wine has the richness, sweetness, and thickness that makes me want to drizzle some over French toast or vanilla bean ice cream. You can find this wine at Total Wine [Springfield location] and since it’s fortified and already fairly oxidized, you can open it up and it should keep for several weeks or more. Enjoy a splash before bedtime every night and have sweet dreams. Cheers!

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come!


Get 1/2 off shipping when you purchase 6 or more bottles of Italian wine with checkout code "vine43"


Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!

My Vine Spot

  • Please Click Here to vote Dezel's My Vine Spot as your favorite wine blog - You can vote 1x per day!
  • Friend me up on Face-Book here.

Happy Sipping Friends - Tell your friends about the blog and thanks for your support and kind emails !

Dezel's My Vine Spot © 2006-2011. All rights reserved.

2/15/2011

Are You Hooked On Varietal Labels?

Hello Friends,

I recently had the pleasure of attending a wine tasting and luncheon that featured the wines of Southwest France. The event took place at BLT Steak in Washington DC and was hosted by Fred Dexheimer of Juiceman Consulting. Fred is very passionate about this Old World wine-producing region and provided a lot of information throughout the duration of the function. The purpose of this get-together was to highlight, as well as to promote, the wines of Southwest France, or as the French say, Sud-Ouest. The Sud-Ouest is an often overlooked wine-producing region that delivers quality wines at reasonable prices. A few weeks after this event, I recall telling a few friends about the food and wines I enjoyed. It was then that I realized that while a few of my friends enjoy a good Virginia (or New World) “Petit Manseng,” “Tannat,” or “Malbec,” they had no clue what wines I was referring to when I said, “Jurançon,” “Madiran,” and “Cahors.”

Enjoy Malbec? Try the wines of Cahors.

One of the main things I personally enjoy about wine is that you never run out of new things to taste and learn. I’m a relatively late bloomer to the wonderful world of wine, but you know the saying, better late than never. Before wine captured my attention, one of my other interests, history, led me to Monticello (Thomas Jefferson’s abode, not the wine trail) in 2005. Following a tour of the home, I spotted a Virginia wine grape sign and visited Jefferson Vineyard. That was my first time visiting a winery/tasting room and sipping good table wine. I ended that day at Kluge Estate, and in the process, I guess you can say I caught the wine bug. I also learned how to pronounce Viognier that day and picked up this important lesson - just because I smell raspberry in a Cabernet Franc didn’t mean that someone added raspberry juice to the wine – overall, a pretty exciting day. Thus my introduction to wines like Petit Manseng, Tannat, Malbec, and many other varietal wines came by way of Virginia wine. Back then, if there was a wine I enjoyed, I learned to look for the name of the grape on the label when I visited other tasting rooms or the local wine shop. My knack for history and inquisitive nature led me to research the different grape varieties and seek out wines from the grape’s homeland as well as regions where the variety has thrived for centuries. This is when I learned about Old World versus New World wines. The catch was, I wasn’t seeking out grape names on a label at the local wine shop, but seeking out geographic regions for most of the Old World wines I was purchasing.

Sud-Ouest France Wines Lunch and Tasting

To make a long story short, wines from the Old World (Europe) are traditionally identified by the place of origin. The focus is not so much on the grape variety as it is on the place that produces the wine. Centuries of wine-growing experience has resulted in a firm determination of which varieties are best suited to specific geographical regions based on unique soil, climate type(s), and other factors. Additionally, each wine-growing region is steeped in centuries of age-old tradition and has appellation laws to preserve the character and integrity of the wine. The focus is on place; thus you’re purchasing a wine to taste the unique characteristics of that region and the wine is labeled to reflect this. New World (non-European) wines on the other-hand, “tend” to place more emphasis on the grape variety and varietal expression as opposed to regional expression. Putting the grape variety on the label is common-place and the average wine consumer finds a certain level of comfort and convenience in that. As a matter of fact, based on questions I asked on Twitter over the course of several weeks, the grape’s name and price are two top factors many consumers take into consideration when purchasing a bottle of wine. For example, when most people go to their local wine shop, they say, “I want a [insert grape variety here] for under $15.” The next time you visit your local wine shop, if you enjoy Petit Manseng, ask for something from Jurançon. If you favor a good Virginia or Argentinean Malbec, ask for a Cahors. If you enjoy Tannat, either Virginia or Uruguay, request a wine from Madiran. These are the same grape varieties, just different growing regions – in particular, the wine-producing region of Southwest France. A fun tasting idea would be to pick up some of these wines from your favorite Virginia producer and then find their Old World partners and have a (blind) comparative tasting with friends. Moral of this story: don’t limit yourself to just varietal labeled wines. Don’t be afraid to try new things when it comes to wine, especially if the price is right. For my Virginia wine lover friends -- there is a Chinon (Cabernet Franc), a Condrieu (Viognier), and Chablis (Chardonnay), etc., that may not sport the name of the grape on the label that you just may fall in love with. Think global, drink global, support local, and keep trying new things. Cheers!

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come!

CLICK HERE to visit Juice-Man Consulting's website.

CLICK HERE to follow Wines of Southwest France on Twitter.

CLICK HERE to visit BLT Steak's website. Great food and wine list!

Get 1/2 off shipping when you purchase 6 or more bottles of Italian wine with checkout code "vine43"


Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!

My Vine Spot

  • Please Click Here to vote Dezel's My Vine Spot as your favorite wine blog - You can vote 1x per day!
  • Friend me up on Face-Book here.

Happy Sipping Friends - Tell your friends about the blog and thanks for your support and kind emails !

Dezel's My Vine Spot © 2006-2011. All rights reserved.

2/08/2011

Quick Sip: Loudoun Valley 2009 Traminette

Hello Friends,

Today’s “Quick Sip” is the Loudoun Valley Vineyard's 2009 Traminette. Loudoun Valley Vineyards is owned and operated by Bree Ann and Cameron Moore and is conveniently located off of Route 9 in Waterford, Virginia. The Traminette grape variety is a cross of Gewurztraminer and Joannes Seyve 23-416. The variety was developed in 1965 at the University of Illinois and later released by Cornell University’s Geneva Experiment Station in 1996. The flavor and aroma profile of Traminette strongly resembles that of its parent, Gewurztraminer. Let’s take a swirl, sniff, and sip!

Loudoun Valley Vineyards 2009 Traminette


In the glass, the Loudoun Valley Vineyard's 2009 Traminette displays a clear pale golden color. The swirl and sniff offers inviting floral (namely fragrant rose petals) aromas with lychee fruit and light citrus hints. The aromas extend to a lean, but balanced and crisp palate along with spicy overtones and light touches of sweet honey. This wine sips nicely on its own and will also work well with moderately spicy ethnic cuisine. The Loudoun Valley Vineyard's 2009 Traminette retails for (about) $15, has a reconstituted cork enclosure, and clocks in at an easy 12.2% ABV. Looking for something to do for Valentine's weekend? Check out Loudoun Valley Vineyard’s events page – they are hosting a gourmet lunch date for two that features live entertainment. Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come!

CLICK HERE to visit Loudoun Valley Vineyard's website.

CLICK HERE to friend up Loudoun Valley Vineyard's on Facebook.


Get 1/2 off shipping when you purchase 6 or more bottles of Italian wine with checkout code "vine43"


Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!


My Vine Spot

  • Please Click Here to vote Dezel's My Vine Spot as your favorite wine blog - You can vote 1x per day!
  • Friend me up on Face-Book here.

Happy Sipping Friends - Tell your friends about the blog and thanks for your support and kind emails !

Dezel's My Vine Spot © 2006-2011. All rights reserved.

2/03/2011

Quick Sip: Arizona Stronghold Vineyards 2008 Tazi

Hello Friends,

After hearing a great deal about the good things happening in Arizona wine country, I’m pleased to feature my very first Arizona wine experience; the Arizona Stronghold Vineyards 2008 Tazi white wine blend. Arizona Stronghold Vineyards is located in the Sulfur Springs Valley (south east Arizona), and is a partnership between Maynard James Keenan (Tool’s front-man and owner of Caduceus Cellars) and Eric Glomski (proprietor and director of winemaking at Page Spring Cellars). The two came together in 2007 to pour their passion into producing wines expressive of Arizona’s unique terroir. Their recent wine documentary, “Blood into Wine”, which I highly recommend, provides good insight into the challenges, disappointments, and successes the duo have encountered in pursuit of crafting high quality vino in Arizona wine country. Without further ado, let’s get to the “Quick Sip” – all this talk about Arizona wine has me thirsty.

Arizona Stronghold Vineyards 2008 Tazi

The Arizona Stronghold Vineyards 2008 Tazi is a white wine blend consisting of 52% Sauvignon Blanc, 21% Chardonnay, 19% Riesling, and 8% Malvasia Bianca. In the glass, the wine displays a pale straw color with green hues. The swirl and sniff reveals a bouquet of fresh, fruity tones of tree fruit, white flowers, and citrus nuances. The palate is on the lighter side of medium bodied and being aged in a mixture of stainless steel and neutral oak gives the wine a round mouth-feel, yet bright and vibrant food-friendly acidity. The wine has good up-front fruit flavors and a lively medium length tangy finish. I paired this wine with garlic chicken spring rolls and it paired nicely. The smooth texture and crisp acidity makes this wine a perfect partner to a wide variety of food dishes. The Stronghold Vineyards 2008 Tazi retails for $17.99, has a synthetic (indicative of a wine meant to be consumed young) enclosure, and clocks in at 13.7% ABV. I leave you with this fine quote from Arizona Stronghold Vineyards: Great wine doesn’t have to be expensive; it doesn’t have to be pretentious; and it shouldn’t be hard to find. It just has to be great and it has to be made by people that care.” 

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come! Disclosure: A sample was provided to www.myvinespot.com for review.

CLICK HERE to follow Arizona Stronghold Vineyards on Twitter.

CLICK HERE to friend up Arizona Stronghold Vineyards on Facebook.

CLICK HERE to visit the Arizona Stronghold Vineyards website.

Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!

My Vine Spot

  • Please Click Here to vote Dezel's My Vine Spot as your favorite wine blog - You can vote 1x per day!
  • Friend me up on Face-Book here.

Happy Sipping Friends - Tell your friends about the blog and thanks for your support and kind emails !

Dezel's My Vine Spot © 2006-2011. All rights reserved.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...