8/30/2011

Virginia: Petit Verdot's Home Away From Home?


Hello Friends,

Last week I got together with a group of wine pals and uncorked several Virginia Petit Verdot wines. We also added an example from California in the mix to make things interesting. Paradise Springs Winery in Clifton, Virginia, who recently opened a beautiful new tasting room, was kind enough to host us. They also included their unreleased 2010 Petit Verdot in the tasting lineup. The tasting was blind, with each wine tasted, then discussed, and immediately un-bagged, which, of course, led to more discussion about the wine being tasted. The goal was not to find a winner or loser, but to discuss this bit player in Bordeaux, Petit Verdot, that seems to be finding a leading role here in Virginia. Over the last few years, Petit Verdot has risen in popularity in Virginia. Some of this attention is because Petit Verdot is still fairly new and a grape variety that can provide some size and structure (red meat wine) to what some consider an otherwise easy drinking lineup. The local wine industry has also done a good job of creating name recognition and demand for Petit Verdot through educating consumers about the grape variety and more producers adding it to their portfolio as a single varietal wine. While fairly new to Virginia, Petit Verdot is very old, hailing from Bordeaux, where it’s used as a minor blending variety to add color, structure, and aroma/flavor components to the regions's red wine blends. Petit Verdot is a late-ripening variety, so over the years it has fallen out of favor in its homeland and acreage has been reduced. During cooler growing seasons in Bordeaux, Petit Verdot may not live up to its full potential or ripen at all. Surprisingly, the ripening problems experienced in Bordeaux, are not a major issue here.

Petit Verdot Wines


Petit Verdot is also used to add color and beef up blends here in Virginia, and ask any winemaker, a little bit of Petit Verdot goes a long way. Add too much Petit Verdot and it can overwhelm your blend or single varietal wine. Remember, for a wine to be labeled with the name of a grape, it must be composed of at least 75% of that grape – the remaining 25% can be anything else. Critics of the variety say that Petit Verdot plays the role of a minor blending variety for good reason. On its own, some think of it as a little one-dimensional, needing help from other varieties to fill gaps, add flavor, and round out the edges. That being said, proof that Virginia may be Petit Verdot’s home away from home is that there are some delicious local examples that are 100% Petit Verdot that are complete wines from start to finish. So, if you’re new to Petit Verdot what should you expect? Consider this: if Petit Verdot is used in very small amounts to deepen color, add structure, tannins, and flavor, then you should expect an inky, bold, and fairly assertive wine in your glass. Especially if you’re getting at least 75% of it in a single varietal wine, right? To wrap things up, in a June 2009 blog post I wrote titled, “Petit Verdot: The Next Big Thing?” I stated, “Not all local Petit Verdot wines are created equal.” I went on to add, “Quality, style, and consistency differ from producer to producer – some hit, some miss.” I still feel this way, but for the most part, there are some very nice, and fairly assertive local examples out there perfect for pairing with rich meats or hearty fare. Below are the wines we tasted and my tweets with some additional comments. Now it’s your turn! Grab a glass of Petit Verdot and drop me an e-mail and let me know how you like it. Cheers!

Glen Manor 2005 Petit Verdot: Red currant, dark fruit, anise, mocha touches, mineral notes, smoke, solid framework, mouth-filling texture, notable depth of fruit, firm, yet integrated tannins. This is a very nice local example with great structure, complexity, balance, and a lengthy finish. Find this vintage if you can!

Rappahannock Cellars 2006 Petit Verdot: Tart cherry and blackberry scents with a dash of pepper and spice that’s backed by a subtle herbal component. Medium-bodied palate has good acidity and supple soft tannins; fairly easy-drinking w/o much structure for a Petit Verdot, but overall, a nice sipping wine.

St. Supéry 2006 Petit Verdot: Rich deep purple color with dominate sweet plum and blueberry aromas. On the palate: plump/ripe fruit, voluptuous in style, with ripe tannins. As it opens, inviting fruit mingles with mocha touches, sweet floral perfume, and an enjoyable, long finish. This is a very nice example from our friends on the left coast. (California)

Pearmund Cellars 2005 Petit Verdot: Dill, pickle-like, mushroom, soft red berry scents (similar on palate) – this wine has mouth-feel going for it but has lost its fruit and freshness. It was cellared properly and likely showed best in its youth. While six years isn’t exactly old for a Petit Verdot in my opinion, I’m left to assume that this wine was made to be enjoyed within 1-3 years of release.

Keswick Vineyard 2009 Petit Verdot: Nearly opaque in color, inviting nose, rich mouth-feel, dark cherry, purple stone fruit, dark chocolate, and subtle vanilla flavors, developed mid-palate with youthful tannins and a nice lingering finish. Tasters had this pegged for the California example.

North Gate Vineyards 2009 Petit Verdot: Deep purple in color with plum, cherry candy, spice, and inviting floral perfume scents. The palate is medium-bodied with velvety tannins, plush mid-palate, and a pleasing medium length finish.

Veritas 2009 Petit Verdot: Deep, rich color with pleasant scents of blackberry, boysenberry, violets, and hints of baking spice and roasted hazelnuts. Aromas extend to the palate with good up front fruit followed by a supple and silky tannin structure and a long smooth finish.

Paradise Springs 2010 Petit Verdot: Dark purple color, dark cherry, dried raspberry hues and a floral, waxy essence, young tannins, tightly wound core. This wine was recently bottled and has not been released yet. It still needs a little time, but started to open up nicely after an hour of breathing. A sure bet for a marbled rib-eye steak when ready.

Pollak Petit 2008 Petit Verdot: Deep color, nice rich black berry, cherry fruit, and floral scents that extend to the palate (w/ good up front fruit). Supple entry with a mouth-coating texture, solid structure and drying finish -- bring on the red meat!

Linden 2006 Petit Verdot: Medium-dark violet color, bright tart cherry/berry flavors (predominately red fruit flavors), integrated tannins, medium structure, and well-balanced. This wine improved with about 30-45 minutes of air; the flavor profile became more pronounced.

[NOTE: Not a part of the tasting, but I recently had it] DuCard Vineyards 2009 Petit Verdot. She's deep purple, fairly bold and robust, with modest dark fruit, toast, and a hint of floral perfume and spicy oak notes, w/ drying tannins in finish.

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come!

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8/23/2011

TasteLive.com with Benziger Family Winery


Hello Friends,

Last week I was pleased to be selected as a panelist for the launch of Benziger Family Winery’s TasteLive channel. The kick-off event included a virtual discussion with proprietor and wine grower Mike Benziger, that was led by host Jessica LaBounty via UStream. Mike also wears the moniker, “Biodynamic Guru," which would be the basis of the evening’s tasting and discussion. For the wines, we had the opportunity to sample six of Benziger biodynamic estate wines and conduct vintage comparisons on two sets of red wine blends. Biodynamic wine-making takes sustainable and organic farming to the next level. Unlike conventional farming, which uses pesticides, herbicides and other chemicals; biodynamic farming strives to keep in check an agreeable and natural balance between man and nature, with man at the helm of this spiritual and holistic endeavor. In the wine-making facility, a non-interventionist approach is taken to craft wines that express a sense of place and the growing season.

TasteLive.com with Benziger Family Winery


Instead of going into biodynamic prep detail such as cow manure and cow horns, Mike shared his thoughts on biodynamic farming and its positive effect on Benziger's four estate vineyards. For example, the transition to biodynamic farming influenced what was over 52 acres of vine plantings to be reduced to 35 acres. This is because some of the land was not well suited for farming wine grapes and biodynamics exposed this. The trade-off was a significant reduction in quantity, but a healthy and balanced vineyard and a significant increase in wine quality. Instead of me repeating what was said, I strongly suggest watching the video segments. After reviewing the video clip below, click on the following links in the order provided: ‘2006 and 2007 Oonapais Sonoma Mountain Red Tasting’, ‘2007 and 2008 Obsidian Point Tasting, and ‘2007 Tribute Tasting’. Of the questions I submitted, the response to “Can biodynamic farming compromise wine quality?” produced a very informative response that you will want to hear for yourself. The biodynamic estate wines we tasted are limited production and only sold via the tasting room and website and are very much worth seeking out. See my tweets on the six wines below the video box. As a final thought, I leave you with this quote from Mike Benziger: “It’s a life’s work to make a wine that is ultimately connected with a place and the people who farm it.” Cheers!

Benziger Family Winery Biodynamic USTREAM Broadcast


Live video by Ustream


2008 Joaquin's Inferno (73% Zinfandel, 27% Petite Sirah): Ripe blue berry, sweet spice, and plum, rich mouth feel, lasting finish, the Petite Sirah provides a nice punch.

2006 Oonapais Red (58% Cabernet Sauvignon, 17% Merlot, 14% Cabernet Franc, 11 Petit Verdot): Rich berry fruit, cinnamon toast, barrel spice, very subtle herbal notes, integrated tannins, round mouth-feel, supple texture, firm, well-balanced structure.

2007 Oonapais Red (63% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Merlot, 10% Cabernet Franc, 6% Petit Verdot, 1% Zinfandel): Dark fruit-spice flavors, hints of coffee bean, hazelnut and sage/basil, nice firm spine, bold, yet tame and rounded tannins, nice spice-driven lingering finish.

2007 Oonapais Point Red (49% Cabernet Sauvignon, 22% Cabernet Franc, and 19% Merlot, and 10% Petit Verdot): Anise, violets, cassis and dark cherry aromas, firm tannins and oak undercurrents, solid structure – begs for red meat!

2008 Oonapais Point Red (90% Cabernet Sauvignon based blend): Rich and smooth w/ ripe plum, cherry and savory flavors. Creamy textured and sipping nicely!

2007 Tribute (84% Cabernet Sauvignon based blend): Tribute wine to Mike’s parents who worked very hard to get the winery established. The 2000 vintage was the first biodynamic wine produced in Napa/Sonoma. Inviting blackberry, plum, and black currant aromas, ripe tannins, good acid balance, and a young, yet mature wine. Simply delicious.

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come!

CLICK HERE to visit Benziger Family Winery website.

Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!


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8/18/2011

Quick Sip: Sawtooth Winery 2007 Syrah [Idaho]


Hello Friends,

Wine is being made in all 50 US states and one of the things I make an effort to do is sample home-grown wines from each. I very much enjoy the efforts and fine liquid poetry grown, crafted, and bottled by our better-known friends out west; namely California, Washington, and Oregon. I equally enjoy finding wine from hard-to-find and lesser-known US wine producing regions that often times surprise and satisfy the curious palate. I just happen to reside in one of those smaller, lesser-known regions, so I'm afforded the opportunity to taste a generous amount of delicious Virginia wine from year-to-year and meet the passionate faces behind the wine. Just recently, I tasted some pretty good fermented grape juice from Colorado, Texas, New York, North Carolina, New Mexico, and Michigan -- and by this time next week, I should have some Ohio wine in my glass.

Sawtooth Winery 2007 Syrah


One of my good Virginia wine pals, Todd Godbout, of Wine Compass and Virginia Wine TV blogs (very busy guy), recently brought a Syrah from Idaho to a tasting I hosted. Prior to the tasting, when I told another friend I was going to have a wine from Idaho, he jokingly asked, "What does potato wine taste like?" "Well my friend," I replied, "There is more than potatoes being grown in Idaho!" The wine, a Sawtooth Winery 2007 Syrah, is grown within the Snake River Valley AVA, which is located in southwest Idaho and spans across eastern Oregon. The wine's composition is 85% Syrah, 7% Cinsault, 7% Mourvedre, and 4% Viognier. In the glass, the wine displays a deep ruby, purple color. The swirl and sniff offer scents of roasted nuts, subtle coffee bean, vanilla, and smoke; that after a few vigorous swirls, give way to sweet spice and dark fruit aromas. The palate is round and smooth with supple oak character up front and dark fruit flavors and spice emerging mid-palate, with soft tannins, and a medium length finish with lingering barrel nuances. The Sawtooth Winery 2007 Syrah clocks in at 14.8 ABV, but holds its alcohol in check fairly well, and retails for $15. This wine is available at some Whole Foods stores in Virginia, and the fairly popular Sawtooth Winery Riesling, can be found at most Total Wine stores for a very reasonable $9.99. In closing, my nose may grow if I tell you everything I taste from some of these lesser known regions is good and/or memorable, but the same can be said for every wine producing region. If you’ve never had an Idaho wine in your glass, here is your opportunity. Variety is said to be the spice of life, so keep tasting and trying new things – for this is the golden age of wine, friends. Cheers!

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come!

CLICK HERE to visit Sawtooth Winery website.

Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!


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8/15/2011

Snooth Says August is Pinot Grigio Month


Hello Friends,

The good folks over at Snooth have started a new program called the ‘Global Tasting Initiative.’ Each month a specific wine varietal will be selected for wine drinkers to taste and tweet about. For the entire month of August, wine lovers are saluting Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris. To see which Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris wines people are sipping and talking about on Twitter, follow the #GTIPinotGrigio hash-tag. Pinot Grigio and Pinot Gris are the same grape variety. Stylistically, the grape is capable of producing a fairly wide range of wines depending on where it’s grown.

Attems 2010 Pinot Grigio


The top two wine producing regions for Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris are Italy and France. In Italy, namely the northeastern regions, where it’s called Pinot Grigio, the wines produced are typically crisp, bright, and refreshing. This is the type of light-bodied white wine you want in your glass on a warm summer day. In Alsace, France, where it’s called Pinot Gris, the wines generally offer a richer mouth-feel and more body, while retaining good food-friendly acidity, generous fruit flavors, and lovely aromatics.

Willow Crest Winery 2010 Pinot Gris

Other regions that produce wine from this grape variety, namely Oregon and California, will typically label their wine based on the style of the wine (Alsace or Italy). For my participation, I tried two examples – a Attems 2010 Pinot Grigio (SRP $19.99) and a Willow Crest Winery ‘Estate-Grown’ 2010 Pinot Gris (SRP $15.99). The Attems 2010 Pinot Grigio, from Friuli-Venezia Giulia (Northeast Italy), is sleek and racy with crisp apple, tangy citrus flavors, and very subtle oak undertones that’s complimented by gentle touches of minerality that extends to the clean, medium length finish. This example makes for a nice aperitif wine and will pair nicely with shellfish and light dishes. The Willow Crest 2010 Pinot Gris, from Washington’s Yakima Valley, is nicely textured and flavorful with a richer mouth-feel. On the palate, tree fruit (pear, apple) comingle with melon and orange peel in this medium-bodied and well-balanced wine. Now it’s your turn! There are two weeks left, so uncork some Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris and share your thoughts on Twitter (remember: #GTIPinotGrigio hash-tag). We’ll be looking for your tweets. Cheers!

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come!

CLICK HERE to visit Attems website.

CLICK HERE to visit Willow Crest Winery website.

Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!

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8/09/2011

Creekside Cellars: Winery and Café [Colorado]


Hello Friends,

During my recent visit to Colorado, I paid a visit to a few tasting rooms on the Colorado Front Range Wine Trail. The Front Range Wine Trail, which is in close proximity to Denver and consists of approximately 15 producers, is broken down into three touring areas: The Northern Region, Denver Region, and Southern Region. From where I stayed in Littleton, CO, the Denver Region, which is about 30-45 minutes to the west, was convenient to get to and provided a generous amount of natural, yet sometimes rugged, beauty and wild life to admire along the way.

Downtown Evergreen, Colorado


As with many Virginia producers, all Colorado tasting rooms are not open for business during the work week. So when I saw that Creekside Cellars was open daily from 11am -5pm, I headed out Monday morning to pay them a visit. Creekside Cellars is nestled in the charm-filled, historic mountain town of Evergreen, CO, and is lined with gift shops, boutique stores, and restaurants.

Creekside Cellars


When I initially stepped into Creekside Cellars, I thought I was at the wrong place. That’s because I didn’t realize that besides being a tasting room and winery, Creekside is also an Italian café -- and judging by the busy lunchtime crowd, a local favorite in downtown Evergreen too. After shuffling through the crowd I made my way over to the tasting bar where we were warmly greeted by a young lady named Michelle Cleveland.

Busy Lunchtime Crowd


Michelle is Creekside Cellar’s winemaker and exudes a youthful energy and passion for her craft. She studied under Bill Donahue, Creekside Cellar’s former winemaker and owner. From the literature I reviewed at the tasting bar, this family-owned and operated business began to develop in the 1980’s as a hobby gone wild for Bill and gang. Their vineyard, called the Vinelands, sits on ten acres in Palisade, Colorado, and is planted to Syrah, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Viognier, and Muscat grape varieties. The Palisade, a popular wine and fruit growing region, is within the Grand Valley AVA, which is one of two Colorado AVA’s (the other West Elks AVA) located in the western half of the state. From what I gather, a large percentage of Colorado’s wine grapes are grown between these two AVA’s because this is where the fruit grows best (e.g. temperate and higher elevations). The fruit is then harvested and transported to the tasting rooms and wineries to the east where the heavy concentration of people are and where vinifera vines have trouble surviving the harsh winters. This is the case for Creekside Cellars.

Creekside Cellar's Winemaker Michelle Cleveland


Creekside Cellars makes upwards of fifteen wines and their production level is approximately 3,000 cases per year. Overall, I can best describe the wines as new world flavor meets old world finesse. Some of the highlights were a varietally correct 2010 Gewürztraminer (SRP $16) that’s produced from a small 2 acre vineyard in the West Elks AVA. A nicely scented, smooth textured, and vibrant 2010 Viognier (SRP $20), produced from Creekside Cellar’s Vineland vineyard, was a pleasant surprise. It’s nice to see this noble northern Rhone grape variety producing very nice wine in several US states now – including Colorado! A barrel sample of a 2010 Chardonnay showed early elegance and a nice balance between fruit, oak, and acidity.

Enjoy Wine and Food with Friends on the Deck


Moving to some of the reds, the NV (non-vintage) Rosso (SRP $18), a bright and easy drinking red wine blend that could be served slightly chilled, is a perfect match to the restaurant’s Italian cuisine. Creekside Cellar's inky colored 2008 Syrah (SRP $25), grown at the Vinelands vineyard, offered black fruit flavors with a hint of spice, hazelnut, and a velvety finish. Packing a generous amount of structure was a still youthful 2008 Petite Sirah ($40) that displayed currant and peppery flavors and begged for a piece of grilled red meat. And if that wasn’t enough, a moderately complex, tasty, and well-balanced 2007Caberent Franc (SRP $30), grown at the Vinelands vineyard, graced my glass followed by a fairly rich and expressive 2008 Petit Verdot. I also had a chance to sample some of the developing wines in barrel and the future of Creekside Cellars is tasting good.
The Future is Tasting Good !!!


In closing, Creekside Cellars offers a friendly and welcoming atmosphere with an emphasis on regional wine and food. The restaurant features indoor and outdoor seating as well as a relaxing deck that overlooks the falls from within Bear Creek. Wine critic and writer Michael Broadbent says that, “Drinking good wine with good food in good company is one of life's most civilized pleasures.” Whether you’re a resident of Colorado or just visiting, be sure to make a date with Creekside Cellars and enjoy the bliss factor of wonderfully paired food and wine with family and friends. This is not just a civilized pleasure, but a simple one worth pursuing many times over with good company. Cheers!

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come!

CLICK HERE to visit Creekside Cellar's website.

Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!

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8/04/2011

Quick Sip: Afton Mountain 2009 Riesling


Hello Friends,

As most of you well know, the Riesling grape variety thrives in relatively cool to cold climates. This aromatic white wine variety expresses itself best in wine producing regions like Germany, France (Alsace), Washington State, and closer to home, the Finger Lakes, New York. Towards the late 80s to early 90s, Riesling was in the top 5 of most widely planted varieties here in Virginia. That’s no longer the case today as acreage has decreased. Generally speaking, Virginia has warm to (very) hot summers, both day and night, and high humidity, which is not well-suited for Riesling. I have always assumed that Riesling was planted back then in such numbers for its name recognition, not because of its ability to produce quality wine grapes. Most local examples I come across are nonetheless decent summertime quaffing wines, but lack varietal character. That being said, within the overall warm-to-hot broad-scale climate are small pockets of cooler mesoclimates at higher elevations where cool climate grape varieties like Riesling can be grown and made into fairly delicious wines. The fruit for the Afton Mountain 2009 Riesling is sourced from White Hall Vineyards, which is one of those sites.

Afton Mountain 2009 Riesling


The Afton Mountain 2009 Riesling, pale straw in color with green hues, offers bright lemon, melon, floral blossom, and citrus aromas that lead to a slender and racy palate with touches of mineral and a dash of sweetness on the medium-length finish. This Riesling is a tasty and refreshing summer sipper and versatile enough to pair with a wide range of foods. My suggestions: Asian and Indian cuisine or light seafood. The wine clocks in at a very moderate 11% ABV and retails for approximately $16. Unfortunately, Afton Mountain informed me on Twitter this week that 2010 is the last vintage of Riesling they plan on making, so grab a bottle or two...three, if you can. However, on the bright side, Afton Mountain does grow and make a very nice Gewürztraminer that’s perfect for summertime sipping too. While Riesling is not a good variety for Virginia in my humble opinion, the Afton Mountain 2009 Riesling shows that in some small pockets of the state, grape varieties you would not expect to find here for obvious reasons, can be made into some pretty darn good wines. In Virginia, expect the unexpected – the results are usually positive. Cheers!

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come!

CLICK HERE to visit Afton Mountain Vineyard's website.

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8/01/2011

#COLWINE: Creekside Cellars 2010 Viognier


Hello Friends,

Last week I was out of town visiting my mother to celebrate my grandmother’s 80th birthday and what great fun we had. In a week’s time, we visited a number of great food spots, including Stubens, a restaurant that piqued our interest on a recent episode of Guy Feri’s Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives. We cooked out, shared stories, laughed a lot, participated in Wine Twit's burger and wine event, and took in some of the state’s natural, but sometimes rugged beauty. The icing on grandma’s cake, especially for me, was getting out and tasting the wines from this small, yet up-and-coming wine region. Like Virginia, Texas, North Carolina, Arizona, etc., Colorado is a wine region that flies below the radar. Based on the wines I had an opportunity to taste, Colorado is producing some very nice wines. Today’s “Quick Sip” is one of the first Colorado wines I uncorked for family and friends during my short stay and it was quite the crowd pleaser. And trust me; it’s difficult to please the crowd in my family because among my mother, aunt, mom’s hubby, and a few friends – everyone has a “wine style” and sticks to it, despite my efforts to channel diversity.

Creekside Cellar’s 2010 Viognier


The refreshing crowd-pleaser we uncorked was a bottle of Creekside Cellar’s 2010 Viognier. A variety I had not expected to find in Colorado to be quite honest. I poured a splash for everyone that evening and comments ranged from, “this is fresh,” “fruity,” and “very refreshing," to “Is this really a Colorado wine?” For me, the Creekside Cellar's Viognier reminded me of a style of Viognier that’s very popular here in Virginia. And that’s the aromatic, fresh, and fruity examples that are aged in neutral barrels to add a dimension to the texture, but leaving no perception of oak on the nose or palate. The Creekside Viognier offers inviting scents of pear, citrus rind, and hints of stone fruit that lead to a bright and sleek palate ending in a clean and refreshing finish. The Creekside Cellar's Viongier comes from their vineyard in Palisade, Colorado, called the Vinelands, which was planted in 2002. This wine retails for $20 and was a good introduction into Colorado wine for us. As I get through my notes, I’ll revisit Creekside Cellars and a few others and tell you why my mother has a crush on a Colorado chimp. Yes, the chimp story is tied to wine. Cheers!

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come!

CLICK HERE to visit Creekside Cellar's website.

Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!

My Vine Spot

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Happy Sipping Friends - Tell your friends about the blog and thanks for your support and kind emails !

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