5/29/2012

This Wednesday on #Winechat: Value Wines


Hello Friends,

Don’t judge a book by its cover or a bottle of wine by its price point: If you’re like me, you probably try a wide variety of wines at all different price points. In the wonderful world of wine, there is always something new to taste and learn. For this episode of #winechat, the focus will be on [super] value wines. Approximately 80% (perhaps more) of wines sold in the U.S. are under $10, and the selection seems endless. I’ve [personally] found some of these budget bottles to be bland and insipid, while others have been a pleasant surprise and offer good everyday value. I invite you to join me and oodles of other wine enthusiasts on May 30th at 9PM EST to share some of your favorite [preferably nationally available] everyday value wine selections that are priced at a little over or under the $10 price mark. After all, summertime is ripe for fun outdoor cookouts and backyard barbecues, so I will especially be eager to hear (and record) your pocket-friendly value wine recommendations. We’ll also scratch the surface on the business side of super value wines – which is an interesting topic within itself.

#Winechat ~ Under $10 Value Wines


A [somewhat] short parable on value wines: I still consider myself a wine newbie and a budding wine enthusiast, but in 2005, when I was first bitten by the wine bug, I was really new. How new? It wasn’t until week three that I figured out how to pronounce vee-ohn-yay. I included a 2005 Honey Moon Viognier, priced at $5.99, into one of the very first blind Viognier tastings I hosted simply to have an inexpensive bottle of wine included. The median price range was just under $20, with the most expensive being a Condrieu ($50). Several months before, a Chinon -- the least expensive wine in the line-up, ranked first in a blind Cabenet Franc tasting I hosted. At the end of the day, the Honey Moon ranked first – scored by a panel of Virginia wine bloggers and savvy wine consumers. Since that time, I’ve included various vintages of the Honey Moon Viognier in blind Viognier tastings and it has come in first place four times and placed in the top three five times. I personally drink wines at all price points (extreme value to luxury), so I’m not pushing value wines by any stretch. I’m just repeating what I said at the beginning of this post, “Don’t judge a book by its cover or a bottle of wine by its price point.” For some odd reason, I find that wines from lesser known (US) regions and inexpensive bottles are sometimes judged before being properly tasted. Horse before buggy, my friends! Cheers!

Click here to view the upcoming #winechat schedule on Marie Payton's 'The Life of Vines blog'. Cheers!


Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come.

Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!

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5/28/2012

flipflop Wines Media Trip


Hello Friends,

I was recently invited to join several bloggers and social media personalities for a visit to flipflop headquarters in Livermore, California. Flipflop headquarters is situated on Concannon Vineyard estate, and both Livermore and Concannon hold a special place in California wine history. The Livermore Valley is one of California’s oldest wine regions. Robert Livermore, for whom the region is named, planted the area’s first commercial grapes in the 1840’s. Concannon Vineyard, a winery founded in 1883 by Irish immigrant James Concannon, produced California's first varietal Petite Sirah [1961] – a variety that’s doing very well in Livermore today.

Concannon Vineyard


Flipflop is a brand with which I already had some familiarity. Their wines are widely available, and since their launch in early 2011, they have become one of the fastest growing wine brands in the US market. Approximately 80% of wine sold in the U.S. is under $10, and flipflop is regarded as a super value brand. Their low price point, fun and not overly serious packaging, is especially appealing to millennials (born roughly between 1980 and 1995); who are one of the fastest growing wine consumer segments nationally. Across age groups however, the average wine consumer’s sweet-spot for everyday drinking is generally a little under or over the $10 mark.

flipflop Wines


Flipflop’s still wines (Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Malbec, Moscato, Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, and Chardonnay) all sell for $7 per bottle and their sparkling wines (Bubbly Chardonnay, Bubbly Moscato, and Bubbly Pinot Grigio), made using the gas injection method, I believe, all sell for $9 per bottle. Flipflop’s vintner David Georges says, “These are just good wines that complement the everyday casual lifestyle.”

Vintner David Georges chats w/ IowaGirlEats


David gave us an introduction into the brand and tasted us through flipflops’s portfolio. David normally dresses casual, wears his hair down, and quite naturally, always has his favorite pair of flip-flops on [according to his comrades seated with us]. He attended the University of California Davis and has dual degrees in viticulture [grape-growing] and enology [winemaking]. He’s made wine for Davis Bynum Winery, Raymond Merlo Estate Vineyards, etc., and has done everything from crafting small-lot batches to high volume production. Some of David’s favorite wine producing regions include Volnay (Burgundy) and Barolo (commune in Piedmont, Italy well-known for producing red wines made with the Nebbiolo grape variety).

flipflop lunch under the Grape Arbor at Concannon



For our tasting, the vintner wore his hair up, sported a blazer, and the only flip-flops visible were the spread of value wines on the table. We all indulged in a good round table discussion about everything from our impression of the wines and marketing strategies, to wine trends and the bulk wine market. With the exception of the Sweet Red [which I personally found perplexing], flipflop’s portfolio of varietal wines, in my opinion, are easy-drinking, uncomplicated, and clean – all showing fairly good [basic] typicity. The 2009 Chardonnay and 2009 Cabernet Sauvignon, in particular, for me, over perform their price point. They both offer added depth of flavor, decent structure, pleasant secondary [barrel] accents, a medium length finish, and for $7 per bottle, I consider these (2) good-to-high QPR wines.

Media group shot at Concannon (following lunch)


Flipflop has also released a lineup of rums (100% Caribbean) recently; a spiced and a silver (SRP $13.99). I’m personally not a spirits guy. My liquid diet consists [almost solely] of wine and water; and since a dry wine is approximately 85% water, I believe I’m meeting the recommended daily intake of the latter. Just before noon, we had the pleasure of meeting with James Moreland; flipflop’s brand ambassador and mixologist, to discuss rum and preview some summer cocktails using flipflop wine and rum. James is an Aussie who lives in New York and speaks with confidence and conviction about his area of expertise.

James Moreland: flipflop’s Brand Ambassador/Mixologist


I thought rum before noon was a bit imprudent, but the mixologist, a term he surprisingly does not care for, assured me everything would be okay. He told a story about laboring in the fruit fields during a very hot summer day – of course, ending with a light and refreshing cocktail in hand (making it well worth the effort). Between the story, which was more spirited (no pun intended) than I can convey with a sentence, and the cocktails James tasted us through; he was right. Using either flipflop rum, and/or a flipflop sparkling or still wine, fresh fruits and juice, James created several delicate, light, and refreshing summer cocktails that are perfect for summer sipping. I suggest clicking here and going to “Drinks” and making a few flippin’ good cocktails for yourself this summer season.

Flippin' Good Light & Refreshing Summer Cocktail


To shed a little light on the brand: flipflop is a brand owned by The Wine Group's Underdog Wine and Spirits unit. The Wine Group is the third largest producer [by volume] in the United States. Labels like flipflop are brands; not tasting rooms, vineyards, wineries, etc. Some of your favorite brands, I’m sure, all fall under this big tent; including Cupcake, Fish-Eye, Big House, Concannon, Franzia, and more. From a [wine] business perspective [marketing in particular], I’m not surprised with the early success of the flipflop brand. In a market [value wine] that’s hugely competitive, you have to strike while the iron is hot. And the savvy, focused, and enthusiastic bunch I had a chance to meet with are doing just that. Lastly, one thing I respect about the flipflop brand is their dedication to charity work. They have forged a beneficial partnership with Soles4Souls; a shoe charity dedicated to providing footwear to those in need. In 2011, the partnership met their goal of donating 11 million pairs of shoes! Cheers!

Happy Sipping from the Underdog Wine Bar (via Chanel Adikuono)



Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come.

Click Here to visit flipflop's website.

Click Here to visit Soles4Souls website.

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come.

Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!

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5/16/2012

Quick Sip: Rockhouse Vineyards 2008 Meritage


Hello Friends,

Outside of wines from the well-known and popular Biltmore Estate Winery, it’s rare for me to get any North Carolina grown juice in my glass. North Carolina is home to more than 100 wineries, all mainly small family-owned operations with small production totals. For this reason, the wines rarely make it out of the state and are mostly enjoyed my local North Carolinians and tourists. Fortunately for me, I have a neighbor (@bkke) with North Carolina roots; so I was able to exercise a “blogger bottle swap” and get some juice from the Tar Heel state in my wine glass.

Rockhouse Vineyards 2008 North Carolina Meritage


The backstory behind this producer bares similarities to other small farm wineries I’ve had the pleasure of visiting over the years. The story: A husband and wife or a group of friends, who are passionate about wine, plant a few vines and start making batches of wine at home for a small circle of friends – and before you know it, it’s a hobby gone wild! That sounds like the case with Lee Griffin and Marsha Cassedy, owners of Rockhouse Vineyards. Their 200 acre farm (10 acres under vine), located in the small mountain town Tryon (i.e. located southeast of Asheville), is planted to classic European varieties. For today’s ‘Quick Sip,’ I’m rocking the house with Rockhouse Vineyards 2008 Meritage (50% Cabernet Sauvignon, 25% Merlot, and 25% Petit Verdot). The wine is deep garnet in color with blackberry, dark cherry, spice, dried herbs, and peppery aromas with light toasty and cedar accents. It’s light to medium in body and balanced by good food-friendly acidity. Overall, a savory and tasty wine that’s ideal for matching with a wide variety of foods and reasonably priced at just under $20. Cheers!

Click Here to visit Rockhouse Vineyards' website.

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come.

Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!

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5/11/2012

Taste-Live: #PinkOut 2012


Hello Friends,

Like most real men, I wear a beard, work from 9 to 5 (Go Dolly!), drive a 4x4 SUV, own an IPad, watch reruns of Gunsmoke (America's favorite western television series), and drink pink early and often. As a matter of fact, I keep a good number of [dry] Rosé selections in my rotation year-round; but, the pink drink really shines and satisfies during the warm summer months. Rosé, with its often times bright and vibrant red fruit flavors and mouth-watering acidity, is one of the most food-friendly and versatile wines you’ll find on the market today. Drier versions of the pink drink, served well-chilled, are perfect (and refreshing) accompaniments to picnic and summer fare, seafood, and just about anything that says ‘backyard barbecue.’ Add some bubbles, preferably made in the traditional method, and a sparkling Rosé can offer nice complexity, wonderful effervescence, and good food matching ability at a fraction of the cost of Champagne – though the latter is quite tasty too. A sparkling Rosé is also a great way to kick things off – be it a party, cookout, or even the day (try a bottle with brunch!).

Varying Shades Of Pink


Now, I do realize that some of you have tried to drink pink (the drier version) and it wasn’t for you. And that’s okay; at least you tried it and perhaps you will “rethink pink” and give it a second chance to dance on your palate and make beautiful music with your food during the spring and summer months. A common misconception about Rosé, however, is that it is a sweet wine. If we’re talking about White Zinfandel and various American blush wines, then you have a point – these are different wines altogether. If you, and you know who you are; have avoided Rosé for this very reason, then give a drier example a try and see what you think. The investment is low (generally $10 -$15) and the reward can potentially be high (you thoroughly enjoy it). Remember these words: Don’t judge a book by its cover or a Rosé by its color!

Below are four examples (including one unique example for a sweeter and adventurous palate) I recently sampled during RAP (Rosé Avengers and Producers) and TasteLive’s fun-filled and tasty virtual #pinkout tasting event earlier this week. Cheers!

* @GloriaFerrer 2007 Sparkling Brut Rosé: Sonoma County producer that specializes in sparkling wines, Pinot Noir, and Chardonnay. I’ve enjoyed this refreshing and delightful vintage a number of times on its own and with a wide variety of foods. The wine offers bright red fruit, citrus nuances, and pleasant yeasty accents w/ a lovely texture. Fine and persistent palate-cleansing bubbles sweep across the tongue with refreshing acidity and moderate complexity -- a flavorful glass full of deliciousness. I'm filing this one under #MustHaveSummerWine. ($42)

* Chateau d'Esclans 2011 Whispering Angel Rosé: Producer nestled in the depths of Provence renowned for producing premium Rose wine. The Whispering Angel is the producer's most accessible selection. This wine is extremely versatile and food-friendly and will compliment a wide variety of dishes. Pale salmon in color with shy, yet vibrant strawberry, raspberry and rose petal scents that extend to the palate with lovely acidity and a fresh fruity finish. Chateau d'Esclans' also offers three other pink selections including a very limited production "Garrus" that's made from 80 year old vines and is not your typical Rosé wine. It's pricey ($100), but also glorious -- I had an opportunity to enjoy a bottle with friends last year. ($22)

* @Envolvewines 2011 Sonoma Mountain Rosé (92% Syrah 8% Grenache): Two boyhood friends come together to craft small batches of premium Sonoma County wine. The Rosé is a lovely pink watermelon color in the glass with inviting [fairly ripe, jolly rancher like] strawberry, rhubarb, and raspberry aromas and flavors balanced by refreshing food-friendly acidity. A delightful, bio-dynamically farmed summer sipper that should be invited to your next backyard cookout. ($24.99)

* Croft Pink Rosé Port (NV): Historic Port house offers this unique wine that targets the millennial demographic who are more curious and adventurous. This wine is a first of its kind that's unique and interesting; but you cannot sip it like a Rosé (19.5% ABV) on a warm summer day. In the glass, aromas and flavors of strawberry and cherry pie dominate with some residual sweetness and a viscous texture. In my humble opinion, great for cocktails and night-clubs. Get a bottle and get a creative! ($20)

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come.

Click Here to visit Gloria Ferrer's website.

Click Here to visit Chateau d'Esclans' website.

Click Here to visit Envolve Wine's website.

Click Here to visit the Croft Pink Rosé website.

Click Here to visit Taste-Live's website

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come.

Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!

My Vine Spot

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5/07/2012

DrinkLocalWine Colorado: Stone Cottage Cellars


Hello Friends,

During my visit to Colorado’s Western Slope, where the lion’s share of the state’s vineyards are located, I had an opportunity to visit a few small family-owned and operated vineyard and farm wineries. The first winery I dropped in on, nestled in the majestic mountains of Delta County’s small town of Paonia, was Stone Cottage Cellars. The tasting room and adjacent 4.5 acre vineyard are situated at a lofty elevation of 6,300 feet and located within the West Elks AVA, which boasts some of the highest vineyards in North America.

Stone Cottage Cellars' vineyard (6,300 ft above sea-level)


Owners Brent Helleckson, a former aerospace engineer, and wife Karen, a former business professional, left the hustle and bustle of the big city [Boulder] with their two children to return to their farming roots and spend more time as a family. The family purchased the Paonia property in 1994, which was already planted to Gewürztraminer, and over time built a modest, yet charming tasting room and a barrel room that’s built into the side of a hill. In addition to the existing Gewürztraminer vines, they planted Chardonnay, Merlot, Pinot Noir, and Chardonnay. Factoid: Their Gewürztraminer vines are some of the oldest in the state at 28 years old.

Stone Cottage Cellars Tasting Room and Barrel Room


By 2003, Stone Cottage Cellars opened its doors to the public and Brent and Karen were fully dedicated to making wines reflective of the West Elks’ unique terroir. What I personally found to be the AVA’s signature feature was expressive, crisp and refreshing white wines. The higher acids, yet still good flavor profile, may be attributed to a slightly shorter growing season, but ample sunshine (light intensity) at 6,300 feet. However, there are obstacles. The most challenging aspect of growing grapes in Colorado’s Western Slope said Brent, “… are frost, birds, hail, coon, elk, and deer.” Karen went on to add, “Late spring frosts can be a threat well into June.”

In the Barrel Room with Brent Helleckson


Despite the challenges, the rewards expressed themselves in a delicious, elegantly-styled [2009] Chardonnay that offered seamless [tree] fruit and oak integration, baking spice, and slight minerality with a wonderful mouth-feel and lingering finish. Equally as tasty was the Stone Cottage Cellars’ 2009 Gewürztraminer; fragrant with lemon peel, citrus lime, spice, white pitted fruit, and mouth-watering acidity. I also had the opportunity to taste a fruit-driven and fairly high octane, yet decently balanced Syrah and a fortified Gewürztraminer dessert wine. The shining stars for me, however, were the food-friendly and well-made Chardonnay and Gewürztraminer wines that I should have in my cellar sometime soon. From vineyard to glass, the family does all the work and produces a manageable 600 to 800 cases of wine annually.

The Beautiful Smith Fork Ranch


After leaving Stone Cottage Cellars, I checked into Smith Fork Ranch for an overnight stay and a memorable wine dinner with a few Delta County wineries, including: Alfred Eames Cellars (fairly ripe, board line intense, modern blends and estate-grown Pinot Noir) and Leroux Creek Inn and Vineyard (B&B, restaurant, poured a well-made Chambourcin and a refreshing Cayuga white). The ranch, located in west Crawford and owned by Linda and Marley Hodgson Jr., is a slice of heaven -- very tranquil with breathtaking views. Dinner was glorious; and it was quite fitting that one of the best pairings of the night was a Colorado Striped Bass Crudo (Italian version of sashimi) and Stone Cottage Cellars 2009 West Elks Chardonnay. If you plan a trip to the Western Slope (Delta County), the Smith Fork Ranch is a great place to stay (friendly atmosphere, near wine country, hiking, horseback riding, fishing, wildlife, adventure, relaxation, and a great wine cellar) and Stone Cottage Cellars a must visit – especially if you’re suffering from the ABC (Anything But Chardonnay) blues. There’s a cure for you in Paonia my friend. Cheers!

CO Striped Bass and Stone Cottage Cellars Chardonnay


Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come.

Next Up: A trip to a few Grand Valley producers


Click Here to visit Smith Fork Ranch website.

Click Here to visit Stone Cottage Cellar's website.

Click Here to visit the DrinkLocalWine website.

Click Here to visit the Colorado wine website.

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come.

Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!

My Vine Spot

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Happy Sipping Friends - Tell your friends about the blog and thanks for your support and kind emails !

5/06/2012

Today at 4PM PST: L’Ecole No 41 Estate Perigee


Hello Friends,

L’Ecole No 41, as many of you are well familiar with, is a family-owned winery located in Washington State. The tasting room is housed in a much talked about early 1900’s schoolhouse that I hope to visit one day soon. From what I’ve heard and seen through pictures, the tasting room still has an old schoolhouse feel to it; with chalk boards, desks, and bookshelves (just substitute the students for wine enthusiasts). Over the years, I’ve enjoyed everything from Semillon to Cabernet Sauvignon from this producer, and their Columbia Valley produced wines are easy to find and reasonably priced. The L’Ecole No 41 winemaking team of Marty Clubb and Mike Sharon, in my humble opinion, have the Midas touch when it comes to Merlot (attention: those of you still bitten by the Sideways bug). I have always been pleased with their Columbia Valley offering and particularly charmed by their estate-grown selection from the Walla Walla Valley AVA.

L’Ecole No 41 Estate 2008 Perigee (Nice label)


Today’s Quick Sip, the L’Ecole No 41 2008 Estate Perigee, is a single-vineyard Bordeaux-style blend (55% Cabernet Sauvignon, 26% Merlot, 11% Cabernet Franc, 4% Malbec, and 4% Petit Verdot) sourced from the best and oldest blocks of the producer’s [co-owned] Seven Hills Vineyard. I will be popping the cork on this wine with oodles of other wine tweeps today for L’Ecole No 41’s Perigee Full Moon virtual tasting from 4PM to 6PM PST on Twitter. The Seven Hills Vineyard (where the fruit comes from), first planted in the 1980’s, is a well-known vineyard in Walla Walla that produces exceptional and expressive red wines. Earlier this year, Stephen Brook of Decanter magazine, named the 2008 Estate Perigee one of the Top 10 Bordeaux blends in Washington State. Owner and managing winemaker Marty Clubb, views Perigee as the ultimate expression of L’Ecole No 41’s Seven Hills Vineyard. I’m honored to have the opportunity to share a glass, thoughts, and tweets with all of you later today on Twitter (Hash-tag: #perigee41) from 4PM to 6PM PST. And since I just popped the cork to decant a third of it, five words come to mind: balance, complex, accessible, elegance – and lastly, delicious. Nice job, @lecole41 -- see everyone online at 4PM PST.  Cheers!

Click Here to visit L'Ecole No 41's website.

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come.

Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!

My Vine Spot

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5/01/2012

DrinkLocalWine Colorado: The Pre-Tour Day 1


Hello Friends

For much of last week I was in the beautiful state of Colorado having a wonderful time supporting and participating in the 4th annual DrinkLocalWine.com conference. What was a successful event in Virginia two years ago, shined the spotlight on the local food and wine industry of Colorado this year. I arrived in Colorado a few days early to take full advantage of a quick trip to the Western Slope. The Western Slope is approximately four hours west of Denver and is where most of the state's wine grapes are grown. Both the Grand Valley AVA and the West Elks AVA are along the Colorado Western Slope and have a climate conducive to many fruit crops, including European grape varieties. Planting wine grapes further east, like in the Front Range area [e.g. Denver, Boulder], for example, is risky business due to vine-killing freezes. The Western Slope has some of the highest vineyards in North America and its low humidity results in low disease pressures – a common problem some US wine producing regions further east face; particularly Virginia. The biggest vineyard challenge Colorado faces is frost. At one point during the Colorado’s Terroir and the Challenges of High Altitudes seminar, Horst Caspari, professor and state viticulturist at Colorado State University, said, “If I was only interested in money, I'd plant peaches, not grapes.”

Row 14 Bistro and Wine Bar ... A Place to Eat/Drink Local


The day before take-off, a few of us who arrived early had the pleasure of meeting up at Row 14 Bistro and Wine Bar with Doug Caskey, a leading Colorado wine advocate and executive director of the Colorado Wine Industry Development Board, and Kyle Schlachter, who I call a jack-of-all-trades – even social media. Row 14 Bistro and Wine Bar is a swanky and sophisticated, yet down-to-earth wine bar located in downtown Denver. Row 14’s executive chef, Jensen Cummings, who also sat in on the “Local Food and Local Wine” Colorado seminar, is deeply passionate about preparing locally raised and grown ingredients and showcasing quality regional wines from the area. During my two visits to Row 14 (yes it was so nice I had to do it twice), I ate and drank local and the food and wine experience was exceptional. One pairing of note was the Espelette Marinated Rabbit and Garfield Estate 2009 Syrah. The latter is a small producer in Palisade, CO, (within the Grand Valley AVA) that I had an opportunity to later visit. For 2009, they produced a well-made flavorful and bright (good food-friendly acid) Syrah with white pepper and spice nuances that marries nicely with the rabbit – totally complementing, not overwhelming the dish. The second dinner was hosted by representatives from Nomacorc; a manufacturer of advanced synthetic wine closures. Fun factoid: One out of every three bottles of wine produced in the US is closed with Nomacorc’s patented synthetic closures.

Wine Bloggers Invade the Western Slope


By the time morning came, several more friends arrived in Colorado and we (Doug Caskey @1winedude @chiefwino @winecompass @winett and @terroiristblog ) packed up and jumped into a rather comfortable 10 passenger turbo prop (and yes, some were nervous… but not me) and headed out to the Western Slope. After landing we paid a visit to Stone Cottage Cellars; a small producer situated at an elevation of 6,300 feet. Stone Cottage Cellars is located in the West Elks AVA and run by a husband-and-wife team. They will be the central theme of the next blog post. In closing, I’m still trying to figure out how someone with the Twitter handle @terroiristblog got to sit in the cockpit next to the pilot [WTH --- LOL]. There will be more on Colorado wine and food to come, friends. Cheers!

Next up: Stone Cottage Cellars


Click Here to visit Row 14 Bistro and Wine Bar website.

Click Here to visit Stone Cottage Cellar's website.

Click Here to visit the DrinkLocalWine website.

Click Here to visit the Colorado wine website.

Have a question about this post, friends? Feel free to leave a comment or send me an e-mail at myvinespot@yahoo.com, and as always, Happy Sipping! Stay tuned ...more to come.

The views from above were Beautiful!


Live, Love, Laugh, Tweet, Sip, Enjoy!

My Vine Spot

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  • Friend me up on Face-Book here.

Happy Sipping Friends - Tell your friends about the blog and thanks for your support and kind emails !

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